By Maurice H. Francombe, John L. Vossen

ISBN-10: 0080542905

ISBN-13: 9780080542904

ISBN-10: 0125330235

ISBN-13: 9780125330237

Major growth has happened over the last few years in equipment applied sciences and those are surveyed during this new quantity. incorporated are Si/(Si-Ge) heterojunctions for high-speed built-in circuits, Schottky-barrier arrays in Si and Si-Ge alloys for infrared imaging, III-V quantum-well detector constructions operated within the heterodyne mode for high-data-rate communications, and III-V heterostructures and quantum-wells for infrared emissions.

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Advances in Research and Development, Volume 23: Modeling of - download pdf or read online

Major growth has happened over the past few years in gadget applied sciences and those are surveyed during this new quantity. incorporated are Si/(Si-Ge) heterojunctions for high-speed built-in circuits, Schottky-barrier arrays in Si and Si-Ge alloys for infrared imaging, III-V quantum-well detector constructions operated within the heterodyne mode for high-data-rate communications, and III-V heterostructures and quantum-wells for infrared emissions.

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Extra info for Advances in Research and Development, Volume 23: Modeling of Film Deposition for Microelectronic Applications (Thin Films)

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Thc vacant site fraction disappears bccause both germane and silane require two sites for adsorption. To test this model, I will consider the growth rate of silicon (P,,,H, = 0). Figure 19 shows the measured growth rates in a number of systems operating with widely different silane partial pressures (142). The solid line shows the predictions of the model using the hydrogen desorption rate measured by Sinniah et al. (102,103) and assuming S s ; , = 4 • 10 3. The fit is excellent despite the wide range of pressure and temperature.

_. _ ~ 1100 1200 1300 Temperature (K) FIG. 22. Surface coverage with H and CI and vacant site fraction during growth l'ronl dichlorosilane. Calculations were lbr a total pressure o 1 2 Tow with 50 sccm SiH~C! e and 6 sire H e. (From M. Hierlemann, A. Kersch, C. Wemer, and H. I. Eh,~'tro~'hem. So~'. ) By removing chlorine from the surface this opens up new active sites for adsorption. Even so, vacant sites are created more slowly than with hydride sources; thus lower growth rates arc always observed for dichlorosilanc than for silanc under similar conditions (147).

This suggests that a single vacant site is required for chernisorption. The subsequent decomposition steps are presumably rapid and result in the overall reaction Eq. (27), which consumes four vacant sites. Sm,s(Ot. W. GREVE Thermal desorption experiments performed on a surface saturated at 160 K show H 2, HC1, and SiC12 desorption peaks (Fig. 18). An SiC1 signal was also observed but this was attributed to cracking of SiCI 2 in the mass spectrometer. Thus vacant sites can be regenerated by the desorption of hydrogen, HCI or SiCI 2 (although desorption of SiCI 2 means there is no net deposition on the wafer).

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Advances in Research and Development, Volume 23: Modeling of Film Deposition for Microelectronic Applications (Thin Films) by Maurice H. Francombe, John L. Vossen


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